Facebook Advertising After iOS14.3: How-To Get Ready For Apple’s Shake Up On Privacy

The marketing world is abuzz with Apple’s iOS 14.3 update and the impacts it will have on digital marketing, and especially Facebook Advertising. If you’re out of the loop – allow us to give you the lowdown, and what you can do to get ready. 

Essentially, Apple is rolling out an update to its iOS14 (the latest operating system for iPhones and iPads) that will allow users to control how they share their data, as well as who they share their data with.

Apps like Facebook, Instagram, TikTok, YouTube etc. will have to ask users for permission to track data on them, and Apple users will have the option of opting-out of sharing data – that will look a little like this “Pal About” example shown.

Facebook has come out, guns blazing, opposing what they dub as disruptive changes, which makes sense, as it will directly limit their ability to receive and process conversion events for users who have opted out. 

While we don’t know how many users will opt-out, Facebook has advised that they will be adapting their Ads Manager platform to align with these regulations regardless – meaning that as marketers we will lose some functionality even if a user opts-in, or is an Android user, for example. 

So what exactly does this mean? Less data and visibility for marketers, and less personalised ads and experiences for users. 

 

To make it clear about what’s to come, we wanted to break down some of these key changes below:

 

Pixel Conversion Events Capped At 8 Per Domain – Verify Your Domain Now!

The Facebook Pixel, a crucial element of tracking your Facebook Ads performance, will now be capped at 8 events per domain. While previously you could essentially create unlimited pixel events and custom conversions, you’ll now have to cull these down to just 8 per domain. 

Another added element to this is how Apple classifies a domain. For multi-national brands with subdomains, only sites with .uk, .us, etc will be classified as separate domains. For brands that opt for /uk /us websites structures, this will be classified as ONE domain – limiting your pixel events even further.

The impact here will be felt on reporting on full-funnel activity, and we’ll likely see under-reported conversions on the events that don’t make the cut. This doesn’t mean they aren’t happening, but under-reporting can affect how we measure the success of campaign activity and allocate budget across the funnel.

We recommend jumping on and verifying your domain ASAP via Facebook Business Manager to prepare yourself for the change. Check out this Guide to Domain Verification for instructions on how to do this. After that, it’s important that brands rank their 8 events in order of importance to the business.

 

No Reporting Breakdowns, Attribution Windows Reduced To 7-Day-Click, 1-Day-View

With the reduction in data collected from users, we will no longer access reporting breakdowns of key demographic info, such as performance by age, gender and placement. This will limit marketers ability to utilise these insights to scale what’s working and optimise what’s not. 

Another key change being implemented is to Facebook’s attribution windows. Currently, the default in Facebook is to report on 28-Day-Click, 1-Day-View – which means marketers have visibility on any action a user takes 28 days after clicking an ad, or 1 day after viewing an ad. This will be moving to just 7-day-click, 1-day-view, meaning that window for attribution will be decreased significantly.

With the attribution window change, expect overall conversions (and revenue, for eCommerce brands) to drop when this rolls out, as Facebook will no longer have visibility on any action after that timeframe. We recommend brands to shift their focus to reporting holistically, using a combination of Facebook Ads as well as tools like Google Analytics as their source of truth.

 

Audience Lists Decrease, Impacting Prospecting & Remarketing Efforts

The final, and potentially biggest blow, will be on Facebook’s targeting capabilities. Any user that opts out will not go into a Custom Audience or Lookalike audience list, which will reduce the reach and efficacy of these audiences and campaigns. This will also impact the accuracy of Lookalike audiences – bread and butter for any good advertiser – as Facebook cannot build a profile on these users, and thus can’t find more like them.

Dynamic Remarketing will also take a hit, as opted-out users will not be able to be dynamically retargeted with the products they’ve interacted with. As personalisation is the key in digital marketing, this could negatively impact bottom-of-funnel conversions.

Instead, marketers may shift back to broader targeting, and there may be more of a focus creating highly engaged creative that can be split tested to resonate with a wider audience to provide similar cut through without a highly targeted audience. 

 

A Look To The Future – Will In-App Interactions & 1P Data Be The Key?

If you’re still with me, you might be spiralling a bit with all of these disruptive changes to come into play! But deep breath – it might not be all doom and gloom. As you can see below, Facebook iOS users in the UK equate to 11 million (roughly 25% of all users). And – we can only speculate on how many of these consumers will actually opt-out. However, it definitely marks a bit of a turning point with Paid Advertising and will certainly flip some marketers best practice’s on their head. 

As all of these changes impact what happens to users data post-click, we may see a shift to optimising for more in-app interactions. With the launch of Facebook Shop, eCommerce brands may be able to mitigate this loss of data altogether, by keeping the user in the app instead of driving them to their website to purchase. For non eCom brands, we may rely more heavily on retargeting to social engagers/video-viewers/followers – again, all data we can gather from in-app interactions. 

Additionally, this pushes the news for all brands to have an effective 1P data collection strategy in place. If we can’t rely on pixel events to remarket to users, how can we collect user data at an earlier stage in the funnel? The key here is for brands to offer a value exchange – what benefits or value can you provide to a user to offer this willingly? And most important – how is your business set up to effectively nurture these customer journeys across different platforms such as Email Marketing?

One thing is for sure – a focus on protecting user’s data isn’t going anywhere any time soon. Brands and marketers alike need to be agile and future-proof their marketing activity to help weather the changes to come. 

 

If you’d like to know more about how PFM can help you mitigate the issues cause by this rollout, get in touch with the team today. 

 

Breaking the Rules – The Brands with the Most Complained About Adverts

Advertisements are always evolving and pushing the boundaries to try and get their message across, whether that’s on TV, in print, or across the many digital platforms that are at our fingertips these days.

But sometimes, things go a little too far, whether that’s an advert that’s in poor taste, culturally insensitive, or just misleading and factually incorrect.

And if anybody wants to complain about an ad, they head to the ASA (Advertising Standards Agency). But which brands have fallen foul of the ASA the most often?

To find out, we’ve analysed the last five years of ASA rulings (note that not all of these rulings were necessarily upheld by the authority).

Most Complained About Brands

  1. Roofoods Ltd (Deliveroo)

Complaints – 323

Rulings – 3

The brand which drew the most complaints across the last five years was Roofoods (better known as Deliveroo), with 323 complaints across three different rulings. The most notable ad which people weren’t happy about was their ‘magic bag’ TV advert. The ad saw a woman collecting a Mary Poppins-style bag containing meals from numerous different restaurants, which, as anyone who has ordered from Deliveroo before will know, isn’t actually possible on the app.

 

  1. Amazon Europe Core Sarl

Complaints – 299

Rulings – 8

In second place was Amazon Europe, with the majority of the 299 complaints relating to the one-day delivery service offered as part of Amazon Prime. Customers complained that their packages didn’t arrive within a day, with a significant number of Prime items not being available for the next-day delivery.

 

  1. Omega Pharma Ltd

Complaints – 222

Rulings – 4

The brand in third place might not be as recognisable as Deliveroo or Amazon, but they still clocked up a hefty number of complaints over the last five years. Omega Pharma saw 222 complaints, which related to promoting an unhealthy body image, particularly amongst young girls, as well as using actors under the age of 18 to do so.

How Many ASA Complaints Are Upheld?

We analysed a total of 1,935 complaints made to the ASA over the last five years or so – of which, the vast majority were upheld to some degree.

1,379 rulings were fully upheld, as well as a further 136 which were partially upheld, meaning over three-quarters of the complaints were dealt with in some way, while it was deemed that no further action was necessary in the case of 420 rulings.

 

The Most Commonly Complained About Topics

The topic which drew the most complaints from the public was food, drink and supplements, with 757 complaints across 92 rulings. This included the misleading Deliveroo advert mentioned earlier, as well as an advert for Philadelphia which suggested that men were incapable of caring for children and a KFC poster which landed them in hot water for using the word ‘cluck’ in place of an expletive.

Other topics which were commonly complained about include ads relating to health conditions (676) and holidays, travel and motoring (554).

The Most Commonly Complained About Media

While we increasingly consume media through the internet, it seems that the adverts which rile people the most are still on TV, with just over 40% of rulings applying to TV ads.

Some of the most complained about TV ads included Deliveroo’s ‘magic bag’ ad (300 complaints), a Photobox advert which the RSPCA complained was harmful to a dog featured in the ad (a ruling which wasn’t upheld), and a Department for Education ad which it was claimed misrepresented how much you could earn by training as a teacher.

Following TV, the most complained about ads featured on brands websites (1,698 complaints) and social media (576 complaints).

 

Methodology

All data was sourced from the ASA, analysing each ruling from December 9th 2015 to December 12th 2020.

Note that not all rulings listed were necessarily upheld and that when analysing the most complained about topics and forms of media, the topic and/or media weren’t always noted in the ruling.

 

Why Digital Marketing is more important than ever in a global pandemic

It is becoming harder and harder for businesses to avoid the shift that marketing approaches have taken from traditional to digital. Digital marketing breaks the boundaries of traditional marketing as it enables businesses to reach significantly wider audiences in a highly cost-effective and measurable way. Consider the addition of a global pandemic and the need for businesses to adopt a digital marketing strategy is crucial.

Now more than ever, your customers are online.

The concept of a ‘new normal’ has led us to rely on technology more than ever as it enables us to communicate with friends and family, be entertained, keep up to date on current events and simply browse in order to keep ourselves occupied. This year, social media platforms saw a significant increase in engagement. The mobile network provider EE reported a 45% increase in data usage for communication services and online browsing between February and May 2020. By June, Facebook reported that 100 million more users had joined their network, with the fastest growing demographic being those aged 65+. On top of this, many businesses have built solutions to social distancing measures by building apps for customers to place orders when in a restaurant or bar. The continued use of these methods is further encouraging consumers to engage with their smartphones, therefore, leading to more engaged users. 

Social media marketing is key to building and maintaining relationships with your consumers in 2020.

If this isn’t enough to convince you of the importance of digital marketing in 2020, consider the benefits it brings to your business – benefits which have only become more prominent through a global pandemic. Digital allows brands to actively engage with their consumers and maintain a high level of customer service, without the need for physical interaction. Digital presents new and creative outlets for brands to engage with consumers through a pandemic, for example through creative content, online events or live streams. Social media marketing is one of the most cost-effective marketing tools out there which allows you to have complete control of who you target, how much you spend and the message you communicate. Let’s not forget that the average price for Facebook ads decreased by 6% in 2019 while ad impressions increased by 37%! 

With the acceptance of a ‘new normal’ and the prediction that consumer behaviour will continue on the same trajectory (even post pandemic) it is important that businesses embrace digital as an opportunity for their brand to align with consumer behaviour in 2020 and implement a strategy for success. 

Ready to implement a successful digital marketing strategy for your business? We are here to help

 

 

Making the most of Micro-Moments in 2020

In today’s evolving online landscape, it’s more important than ever for brands to create meaningful connections with their customers. Upon successful optimisation of their digital approach, brands can build these connections in as little as a micro-moment.

What is a micro-moment?

A micro-moment is a moment of intention when a consumer turns to their technological device to act on a need to learn something, do something, discover something, watch something or buy something. Or, as Google describes it, the four ‘game-changing moments that really matter’:

The concept of micro-moments is game-changing for marketers. Traditional marketing tells us that the consumer decision journey is linear, as it travels through the awareness, consideration and decision phases. However, as we move through a digital world where consumers are never far from a wealth of information on their smartphones, the consumer decision journey is more dynamic than ever as it is fragmented into hundreds of micro-moments.

As we act on our needs in these micro-moments, our expectations are high and our patience low. This means that the quality and relevance of marketing is more important than ever. In order to compete in these moments of unpredictability and get the most out of micro-moments in 2020, your brand should:

 

  1. Identify your customers’ micro-moments

In the era of ‘shopping never sleeps’, mobile phones have reshaped micro-moments. Consumers are now able to turn to their phones in search of immediate answers to questions like “how to make a chocolate cake” instead of rifling through their gran’s old cookbook. In using digital to deliver against consumer needs, brands should utilise keyword research tools and social listening to help better understand when, where and how their consumers are researching and making purchase decisions. This understanding then allows brands to optimise products and services in real time to align with consumer needs. 

 

  1. Show up in these moments 

Once you have figured out where and when your customers are showing up, you need to be there too. By creating a comprehensive strategy that works across multiple channels, you can show up for your audience when and where it’s important in order to successfully win over consumers. An effective approach to leveraging micro-moments involves being available, responsive and supportive in these moments.

 

  1. Deliver relevant content 

Simply being there is no longer enough: you need to create content that provides answers to the questions your customers are asking. Building relevant content involves creating a 2-way conversation between you and your customers. Consumers today are seeking a deeper level of engagement, which can be a challenge for brands. In overcoming this challenge, marketers can take advantage of technology platforms which integrate all marketing functions, including data integration, integrated platform analytics and campaign deployment, such as Social Bakers

 

  1. Make it easy for consumers to make their purchase

Simplify your purchase process to as few clicks as possible. Automating the customer journey allows brands to minimise the chance that consumers will drop off before reaching the purchase stage. However, it is key that you establish a strategy to regain the attention of those consumers who do drop off – for example, through retargeting campaigns and personalised messaging. Furthermore, brands should acknowledge that the consumer journey does not end at the purchase stage. In fact, a study by Autopilot found that brands who stay in touch with consumers every two to four weeks generate twice as many leads as brands that don’t. 

  1.  Measure every moment that matters 

The path to purchase is now fragmented and unpredictable. Therefore, it’s key that you evaluate your results to reflect this by measuring across every touchpoint. 

Sephora is just one example of a brand which has realised the power of their consumers’ I-want-to-buy micro-moments. The brand has successfully understood how they can show up for their consumers across online and in-store touchpoints as they reach the purchase decision stage. At the decision stage, consumers shopping in-store would turn to their smartphones to read product reviews in order to decide between products. Sephora responded to this by creating an app which allows consumers to easily access product reviews and tutorial videos simply by scanning a product when in store. Through this medium, Sephora has successfully answered questions that consumers didn’t even know they had. 

Micro-moments, and the new dynamic consumer journey, are gaining momentum. Therefore, it’s key that your brand integrates these behaviours into a reconstructed marketing strategy in order to remain competitive in today’s online landscape. 

Wondering how your brand can effectively utilise micro-moments?

 

If you’re looking for digital marketing support, we’re here to help – so get in touch today!

 

Pilot Fish Media has a New Captain

Welcome to our new Head of Agency, Daniella Karaoglan. A letter from our Founder, Stephen Gorman.

 

Since founding Pilot Fish Media in 2013, I’ve been thrilled to see it grow and evolve into the vibrant social media agency we are today, with an array of different clients and exciting challenges to develop and master. From our humble beginnings I couldn’t have imagined how quickly we would blossom into an all-encompassing digital agency. The team has expanded, new expertise has been added and our portoflio has grown considerably.

I too have had various parts of my life multiply, both in business but also with new additions to the family. With all that in mind, I made the decision that in order to give our ever-expanding list of clients the top-quality professional experience and content they deserve, Pilot Fish Media would need to appoint a new Head of Agency. It is therefore with great pleasure I can announce that our very own Daniella Karaoglan has been promoted to ensure our lengthening list of brands will continue to get the care and expertise they should.

Daniella (affectionally known as Dan) came on board as the Campaign Director for the past year and was already been going above and beyond bringing all hands-on deck in an incredible effort that has seen our portfolio triple over that period. Part of this success can be put down to her focus on creative as well as the data, to provide the complete package to brands from all fronts.

Growing up between Denmark and Brazil, Daniella moved to Scotland to study International Business. She fell in love with the country and, after various other social media and digital marketing positions where she more than learnt the ropes, Dan found herself landing at Pilot Fish Media. Since then her focus has been on making waves with outstanding creative and disruptive digital, helping our brands go from strength to strength. This coupled with always running a tight ship with an ethos of transparency, honest reporting and exploring how to gain optimal performance through collaboration, both within the team and with clients, has led to long standing and fantastic working relationships with treasured brands.

It was therefore not a hard decision to appoint Dan our new Head of Agency – a position which I know she will not take lightly. Already implementing a new strategic plan over the course of the next few months, Dan’s main aims will not only be to continue providing our clients with a first-rate service but optimising the team internally. This includes some new additions of staff and expertise, improving the team’s welfare (especially during such a long period of working remotely) and developing the brand as a whole, to put Pilot Fish Media at the fore of social and online as we move through an always changing digital landscape.

This isn’t to say I won’t continue to be involved of course, think of it as Pilot Fish Media having a new energetic and adventurous captain at the helm, with an old sea dog ready to give words of wisdom to her along the way.

 

Stephen Gorman – Founder, Pilot Fish Media