In Other News: Twitter and Pinterest introduce new features, and LinkedIn streamlines its business tools

Another weekly round-up has landed! Here you can catch up on what’s going on in the digital space. This week, we’re sharing the latest goings on with Twitter, Pinterest and LinkedIn. 

 

Twitter introduces the ‘Communities’ feature

 

First appearing on iOS and the Web, Twitter has introduced Communities, a user-maintained spaces for discussion, sharing and connecting with other users who share a similar interest.

“Some conversations aren’t for everyone, just the people who want to talk about the thing you want to talk about. When you join a Community, you can Tweet directly to that group instead of to all your followers. Only members in the same Community are able to reply and join the conversation so it stays intimate and relevant.” (from Twitter)

 

Tweets shared with a community are public, but only users within the community can like, respond, retweet… Communities are moderated by users within that community, who can invite users and manage memberships.

 

Pinterest introduces Idea Pin resharing

 

Pinterest’s story-like feature “Idea Pins” has received a new quality-of-life improvement, allowing Pinterest users to reshare their idea pins to Facebook and Instagram stories. Idea Pins differ slightly from stories on other platforms, allowing for rudimentary animation, voice over, and stock music that plays across stories natively. This requested feature could prove vital to eCommerce brands wanting to leverage greater followings on Facebook and Instagram, as well as using those platforms’ native shopping tools.

 

LinkedIn launches new business features

 

Launching on 4 October 2021, LinkedIn has announced three new features to help businesses on their platform engage with their followers and other LinkedIn users. The three new features being introduced are as follows:

 

Articles For Pages

Pages can now publish long-form “blog-like” content natively, a feature previously reserved only for users. This also includes a variety of audience insight tools applied to those reading the content.

 

Live Events

Combining their native LinkedIn Live and Scheduled LinkedIn Events tools, the new platform allows pages to promote streams, users to pre-register their attendance, notifications to registered attendees/page followers, and event replay. In addition, a page/user now only needs >150 followers to schedule a live stream.

 

Measure and Optimise Brand Awareness

This feature includes “Brand Lift Testing” – a baseline of brand-awareness is taken, allowing pages to measure change in brand awareness vs. these established metrics.

“Reach Optimisation” – Maximising the number of unique users seeing ads, improving exposure to relevant audiences

and “Reach/Frequency Forecasting and Reporting” – pages can now view a campaign’s predicted reach (the number of accounts having seen a post from their page) and frequency with their forecasting tool. It then measures these results in the campaign manager.

Need some help optimising your LinkedIn presence or leveraging your brand’s Idea Pins across platforms? To get a free audit of your current social strategy, get in touch at gra@pilotfishmedia.com.

In Other News: What will the future Instagram, LinkedIn and Pinterest look like?

Welcome back to another weekly round-up where you can catch up on what’s going on in the digital space! This week we’re sharing what our world of social media could look like going forward, featuring Instagram, LinkedIn and Pinterest. 

 

Instagram’s new ‘Montage’ feature

 

It’s no secret that TikTok is killing it in the social space at the moment, taking the top place for most downloaded app for over a year now. According to Instagram, due to their reels continuing to grow in popularity, they are now keen to keep up momentum with users using reels to compete with TikTok, while also aligning with rising usage trends. 

 

Their latest development comes in the form of a ‘Montage’ option which is currently being tested internally. This feature allows users to convert Instagram Stories frames into short Reels video clips which will all be automatically generated by the app. This will then be followed with the option to add suggested music, similar to TikTok. 

 

Although there is no date for if and when this will be rolled out, this tool seems straightforward and a logical next step for Instagram to promote video content on their app, which currently generates the most engagement. 

 

LinkedIn has hopped on board

 

Joining all of the other major social media platforms on the market right now, LinkedIn has finally launched ‘Dark Mode’ which allows users to choose from an alternate display option on both desktop and mobile.

 

Originally dark mode tools were released to limit exposure to blue light and to be easier on the eye for users when using devices in low light. Research has shown that “blue light can cause your brain to stop producing melatonin, which can then lead to disrupted sleep cycles, making it harder to fall asleep”.

 

As well as this LinkedIn hopes in ‘Dark Mode’ will allow it’s platform to become more inclusive and accessible to its users, helping reduce eye strain and keeping in mind light sensitivities. 

 

Pinterest introduce ‘Watch Mode

 

Another platform following in the footsteps of TikTok is Pinterest. They are the newest app looking to release ‘Watch’ mode, which is a scrolling, vertical feed of content currently being tested for pin discovery.

 

Although this feature has not yet launched (currently there is no information on how many users can access this test), it seems you will be able to switch from ‘Browse’ mode which is what you currently know as the traditional Pinterest search field, to ‘Watch’ mode. Unlike TikTok, it seems you will be able to flick through both video and still image pins. 

 

After releasing ‘Story Pins’ in September of last year, this next step of launching ‘Watch’ mode fits in well with the app’s progressive approach to development and we’re excited to see if this takes off in the near future!

 

Need some inspiration for your social media marketing? To get a free audit of your current social strategy, get in touch at rachel@pilotfishmedia.com

In Other News: How Snapchat, LinkedIn and TikTok Are Changing

Get the latest news from the world of social, featuring LinkedIn, TikTok and Snapchat, in our social media round-up. 

 

Welcome to In Other News: the best place to find out about the latest social media news, written weekly by a member of the Pilot Fish Media team. This is where we’ll be sharing our insights about the latest trends and changes across social – we’ll keep you posted!

 

Say hello to Snapchat Trends

 

In August, Snapchat launched Snapchat Trends: a platform which helps marketers and content creators explore what’s hot and what’s not on Snapchat.

 

This new feature helps users see the most popular keywords people are chatting about and allows them to explore topics of their choice in a searchable database.

 

This information could prove invaluable to businesses wanting to reach a younger audience, with 75% of Snapchat’s users being millennials and Gen Z. Markets can discover what trends and products people are talking about, the type of people interested in their brand or business, and even what language they’re using to speak about it.

LinkedIn Stories end this September 

 

LinkedIn Stories, which were initially introduced in September 2020, will be removed by the end of September.

 

The move comes after feedback from users, which will be used to recreate how video can be used on LinkedIn. Users stated they want longer-lasting video content that can live on their profile and also said they wanted a feature with more creativity to help them produce more engaging content.

 

What’s next for LinkedIn? According to Senior Director of Product Liz Li, the Stories feature will evolve into a video format that’s “even richer and more conversational”, combining mixed media and creative tools. Get ready to brush up your professional profile!

 

TikTok takes on TV in latest ad

 

TikTok has set its sight on taking on TV, as shown by its recent ad with Ant and Dec.

 

The ad, which whizzes through the history of entertainment in a minute-long series of sketches, finishes with And and Dec, along with a range of creators, making content for TikTok.

 

James Rothwell, Head of Marketing, EMEA at TikTok said that the campaign was a “testament to the growth of our brand, and our disruption in the entertainment space.” 

 

With the platform having recently overtaken YouTube for average watch time in the US and the UK, it seems that TikTok’s ambition is unstoppable. Although Youtube currently takes the lead for overall time spent, thanks to its wider audience, TikTok could be seeking to change that as it places itself at the heart of mainstream entertainment.

 

Already thinking about how you can upgrade your social game? Get in touch at freya@pilotfishmedia.com to talk all things social, from copywriting to digital content strategy.

We’ve Made the Top 30 Best Influencer Marketing Agencies 🎉

Obsessed with influencers? Us too – that’s why we love working with them!

We’re delighted to have been chosen by DesignRush as one of the top 30 best influencer marketing agencies around. 

When you’re looking for the right agency to work with, DesignRush does the hard work for you. They analyse and rank the best agencies worldwide and sort them into a simple, trustworthy guide so that you can find the perfect agency for whatever you need.

We couldn’t be happier that thanks to our excellent work on influencer marketing campaigns, we’ve been recognised as one of the best agencies to work with in the influencer marketing category. 

As a full service digital marketing agency, we bring together the power of data with our engaging, in-house creative to achieve real, measurable results. We work on everything from paid social to PPC to boost brands’ online presence and drive sales for our clients. 

With this recognition from DesignRush, we’re looking forward to helping even more clients create a splash in the Scottish market with our influencer marketing campaigns. Born and bred in Edinburgh, we know Scotland better than anyone – and can help introduce you. 

Find us in DesignRush’s influencer marketing category here!

 

Want to reach new customers in Scotland? Our influencer marketing campaigns can help you build your brand and boost awareness of your offering. Get in touch with paff@pilotfishmedia.com to learn more about what we can do for you!

Losing Followers

Which Reality Stars are Losing the Most Followers on Instagram?

 

We all know that celebrities rely heavily on their social media strategy, making sure they keep up a good following to give them clout as well as those all-important advertising and sponsorship opportunities. 

 

However, keeping followers is easier said than done, and with a combination of fake followers and real followers with short attention spans, some celebs see their follower numbers dropping at quite a rate. But which reality TV stars are losing the most followers?

 

We looked at a number of UK and US-based reality TV stars from a range of different shows, paying attention to their followers during a 30 day period between May-June 2021 to see who is losing followers.

 

The Reality Stars Losing the Most Instagram Followers

 

Out of the 50 reality TV stars with falling follower numbers, we see some TV shows make repeat appearances, such as Love Is Blind and Love Island. However, the star who tops the list is a well-known face from the American reality show, Dance Moms. Maddie Ziegler might be known for her dance moves in music videos, but she started out on reality TV. And with over 32,000 followers lost in just a 30 day period, Maddie is losing followers at the fastest rate.

  1. Maddie Ziegler – Dance Moms – 32,070 lost followers
  2. Giannina Gibelli – Love Is Blind – 21,720 lost followers
  3. Lauren Speed – Love Is Blind –  17,400 lost followers
  4. Antoni Porowski – Queer Eye – 13,200 lost followers
  5. Morgan Simianer – Cheer – 12,990 lost followers
  6. Amber Gill – Love Island – 12,960 lost followers
  7. Ovie Soko – Love Island – 11,730 lost followers
  8. Curtis Pritchard – Love Island – 10,650 lost followers
  9. Lexi Brumback – Cheer – 10,200 lost followers
  10. Lauren Conrad – The Hills – 10,110 lost followers

 

The US Reality Stars Losing the Most Followers

 

The list of US reality stars losing the most followers features a number of names from Love Is Blind, including Giannina Gibelli and Lauren Speed, who round out the top three alongside Maddie Ziegler.

  1. Maddie Ziegler – Dance Moms – 32,070 lost followers
  2. Giannina Gibelli – Love Is Blind – 21,720 lost followers
  3. Lauren Speed – Love Is Blind –  17,400 lost followers
  4. Antoni Porowski – Queer Eye – 13,200 lost followers
  5. Morgan Simianer – Cheer – 12,990 lost followers
  6. Lexi Brumback – Cheer – 10,200 lost followers
  7. Lauren Conrad – The Hills – 10,110 lost followers
  8. Amber Pike – Love Is Blind – 9,720 lost followers
  9. Melissa Gisoni – Dance Moms – 8,190 lost followers
  10. Damian Powers – Love Is Blind – 7,800 lost followers

 

The UK Reality Stars Losing the Most Followers

 

When it comes to the UK reality stars, it’s a Love Island wash-out! Some of the best-known names from the series feature in our top 10, with 2019 winner, Amber Gill taking the top spot with 12,960 followers lost in just 30 days.

  1. Amber Gill – Love Island – 12,960 lost followers
  2. Ovie Soko – Love Island – 11,730 lost followers
  3. Curtis Pritchard – Love Island – 10,650 lost followers
  4. Luke Trotman – Love Island – 8,610 lost followers
  5. Sam Gowland – Love Island – 8,190 lost followers
  6. Chris Hughes – Love Island – 7,830 lost followers
  7. Amy Hart – Love Island – 7,020 lost followers
  8. Chris Taylor – Love Island – 6,960 lost followers
  9. Amber Davies – Love Island – 6,570 lost followers
  10. Georgia Steel – Love Island – 6,270 lost followers

 

Methodology:

 

We collated the names of US and UK reality TV stars, using a number of sources, such as Wikipedia, Radio Times and The Tab. In total, we looked at more than 200 reality stars, taking just the 50 stars losing the most followers, featuring 25 from the US and 25 from the UK.

Lost follower numbers and current follower numbers were taken from Social Blade.

Privacy Problems

How closely do we really read privacy policies?

 

We’re all guilty of clicking the ‘accept’ button without reading the terms and conditions, but do we really know what we’re agreeing to when it comes to the privacy policies of our favourite websites and social media platforms?

 

We took a look at the privacy policies of some of the most popular websites in the world as well as some of the UK’s official government sites to find out how complicated they are and whether they are easy for users to understand.

 

The Wordiest Privacy Policies

 

There’s a lot to cover in a privacy policy, from detailing the information collected on the site to explaining links to third-party sites. Looking at 80 different websites, we found that some were particularly thorough. The average word count of all 80 policies is 5,130, but Indeed’s privacy policy takes the title of wordiest policy with 15,420 words.

  1. Indeed – 95,042 characters, 15,420 words, 629 sentences
  2. MyFitnessPal – 83,680 characters, 13,417 words, 684 sentences
  3. Samsung – 72,239 characters, 11,241 words, 346 sentences
  4. Daily Mail – 61,631 characters, 9,846 words, 506 sentences
  5. Silver Singles – 59,118 characters, 9,246 words, 422 sentences
  6. Weather.com – 58,830 characters, 9,219 words, 457 sentences
  7. Etsy – 55,809 characters, 8,885 words, 381 sentences
  8. eBay – 52,299 characters, 8,149 words, 358 sentences
  9. Bumble – 45,261 characters, 7,441 words, 301 sentences
  10. eharmony – 45,253 characters, 7,342 words, 401 sentences

 

The Shortest Privacy Policies

 

Other companies keep their privacy policies far briefer, with Barclays offering the shortest policy at just 345 words long. While the privacy policy page offers an overview of the policy, it also includes links to other pages where users can find more information about how data is used as well as the cookies policy.

  1. Barclays – 2,152 characters, 345 words, 22 sentences
  2. Craigslist – 5,551 characters, 890 words, 53 sentences
  3. GOV.UK – 8,066 characters, 1,346 words, 142 sentences
  4. NatWest – 9,984 characters, 1,649 words, 96 sentences
  5. Imgur – 10,217 characters, 1,694 words, 83 sentences
  6. IMDb – 17,082 characters, 2,623 words, 181 sentences
  7. ESPN – 17,534 characters, 2,681 words, 112 sentences
  8. NPR – 18,513 characters, 2,882 words, 151 sentences
  9. BBC – 18,671 characters, 3,338 words, 257 sentences
  10. ASOS – 19,576 characters, 3,504 words, 219 sentences

 

Privacy Policy Read Time

 

When we break it down into how long it would actually take to read these wordy privacy policies, we can see that some of these policies require a huge chunk of time just to read them, let alone understand them. If you want to sit down and read Indeed’s privacy policy, you’ll need to set aside just over an hour of your time.

  1. Indeed – 1 hour 1 minute
  2. MyFitnessPal – 53 minutes 40 seconds
  3. Samsung – 44 minutes 57 seconds
  4. Daily Mail – 39 minutes 23 seconds
  5. Silver Singles – 36 minutes 59 seconds
  6. Weather.com – 36 minutes 52 seconds
  7. Etsy – 35 minutes 32 seconds
  8. eBay – 32 minutes 35 seconds
  9. Lloyds Bank – 31 minutes 28 seconds
  10. Bumble – 29 minutes 45 seconds

 

Privacy Policy Sentence Breakdown

 

When writing important documents, the way we construct sentences really does matter. Longer sentences tend to make text more difficult to read and harder to understand, making it less accessible. As a general rule, 20-25 words is a good length for sentences, and some of these sites are really pushing the top end of that guideline with their privacy policies. Samsung, however, tops the list with an average sentence length of 32.5 words. At the other end of the scale is GOV.UK with just 9.5 words in the average sentence, making it far more accessible for users.

The longest sentences

 

  1. Samsung – 32.5 words per sentence
  2. Bumble – 24.7 words per sentence
  3. Indeed – 24.5 words per sentence
  4. Netflix – 24.4 words per sentence
  5. Tumblr – 24.2 words per sentence
  6. ESPN – 23.9 words per sentence
  7. Forbes – 23.5 words per sentence
  8. Etsy – 23.3 words per sentence
  9. Instagram – 23.3 words per sentence
  10. eBay – 22.8 words per sentence

 

The shortest sentences

 

1. GOV.UK – 9.5 words per sentence

2. Lloyds Bank – 12.3 words per sentence

3. New York Times – 12.8 words per sentence

4. Zoom – 12.9 words per sentence

5. BBC – 13 words per sentence

6. Wish – 13.6 words per sentence

7. Tripadvisor – 14.2 words per sentence

7. Tesco – 14.2 words per sentence

9. IMDb – 14.5 words per sentence

10. Target – 14.8 words per sentence

 

Privacy Policy Reading Ages

 

Each privacy policy has differences that make them more or less complicated to read. From using unusual words to long sentences, these differences can make policies difficult to read for some age groups, meaning that it is harder to understand what is being agreed to.

 

The Flesch reading score is a score given to text to assess how readable it is based on age and education level. A lower score indicates that the text is more complicated, whereas a higher score indicates that it is readable for those with lower reading ages.

The highest reading ages

 

1. ESPN – 30 Flesch reading score, 18+ reading age

2. CNN – 31 Flesch reading score, 18+ reading age

3. Netflix – 32 Flesch reading score, 18+ reading age

3. eBay – 32 Flesch reading score, 18+ reading age

5. Fox News – 36 Flesch reading score, 18+ reading age

5. Business Insider – 36 Flesch reading score, 18+ reading age

5. Fandom – 36 Flesch reading score, 18+ reading age

8. Etsy –  37 Flesch reading score, 18+ reading age

8. PayPal –  37 Flesch reading score, 18+ reading age

8. Silver Singles –  37 Flesch reading score, 18+ reading age

8. Amazon –  37 Flesch reading score, 18+ reading age

 

The lowest reading ages

 

1. BBC –  71 Flesch reading score, 12 reading age

2. ASOS – 66 Flesch reading score, 13 reading age

2. Lloyds Bank – 66 Flesch reading score, 13 reading age

4. GOV.UK –  59 Flesch reading score, 15 reading age

5. NatWest –  55 Flesch reading score, 15 reading age

5. Royal Mail – 55 Flesch reading score, 15 reading age

5. Tesco – 55 Flesch reading score, 15 reading age

8. NHS – 53 Flesch reading score, 15 reading age

8. Snapchat – 53 Flesch reading score, 15 reading age

10. New York Times – 52 Flesch reading score, 15 reading age

 

The Sites with the Worst Data Breaches

While the privacy policy is designed to help users understand what data they’re giving a website access to when it’s used, what happens when that data is breached and falls into the hands of hackers with nefarious motives?

 

Of the 80 sites we studied, 14 have had data breaches with a total of 1,442,064,223 accounts compromised. The biggest breach took place in August of 2019 and involved the accounts of nearly 20% of Facebook users. Compromised data included everything from phone numbers and email addresses to employer names and phone numbers.

 

  1. Facebook – 509,458,528 compromised accounts
  2. MySpace – 359,420,698 compromised accounts
  3. LinkedIn – 164,611,595 compromised accounts
  4. Adobe – 154,445,165 compromised accounts
  5. MyFitnessPal – 143,606,147 compromised accounts
  6. Tumblr – 65,469,298 compromised accounts
  7. SHEIN – 39,086,762 compromised accounts
  8. Snapchat – 4,609,615 compromised accounts
  9. Imgur – 1,749,806 compromised accounts
  10. Forbes – 1,057,819 compromised accounts

 

 

Methodology:

 

The 80 websites studied are taken from a compilation of lists of some of the most visited websites according to sources including Visual Capitalist, SEM Rush, The Telegraph, and Similar Web.

 

Finding the privacy policy page, we copied the text for these policies and ran them through Grammarly. This allowed us to find details such as the Flesch reading score and reading age, as well as compiling the word counts, sentence lengths and reading times.

 

Information about data breaches was taken from Have I Been Pwned’s list of sites with data breaches.